Witherspoon Street Presbyterian Church has been a church home for generations of Princetonians for the last 175 years.

 

African American Roots

Sat May 6, 2017 5 pm. Nationally renown piano soloist and recording artist, Clipper Erickson will perform a concert featuring the piano works of prolific African-American composer, Nathaniel Dett (1882-1943).  Dett's unique contribution to American music fuses European characteristics and traditional Negro music.  This spiritual and moving style is not to be missed! Employing a "colorful and powerful" technique, Erickson has performed throughout America and internationally. He teaches at Westminster Conservatory in Princeton, Temple University and Rutgers University, Camden Campus.

History

A Church for the Future

Photo Credit: ms.akr

Photo Credit: ms.akr

Designated Pastor

Witherspoon St. Presbyterian Church in Princeton, NJ is seeking  to call a Designated Pastor to be an enthusiastic leader and teacher to motivate our congregation to grow in faith; to lead us in developing long-term strategies for church growth and financial stability; to build on our rich legacy to remain on the forefront as a change agent on social justice issues.  If you are interested and have been previously ordained, please send a letter of inquiry to wspcpnc2016@gmail.com for more information. 

 

Our Mission ›

Paul Robeson

Paul Robeson

Born in 1898 he became one of Princeton's best known residents. Son of a former slave, the Reverend William Robeson of the Witherspoon Street Church, Robeson achieved fame as an athlete, a singer and actor, a scholar, a law school graduate and a political activist, for which he was persecuted during the McCarthy era. He eventually quit his film career because he was dissatisfied with the types of roles that were available for black performers. He lived abroad in voluntary exile for five years, returning to the United States in 1962.  Robeson spoke about discrimination and civil rights before it was “popular” to speak out against these causes and also covered topics like communism, and blacklisting.   WSPC formed a coalition to raise funds to purchase his boyhood home at 110 Witherspoon Street, maintaining what is now referred to as the Paul Robeson House.  The overall goal of maintaining the Robeson House is to promote the ideals that Robeson supported in his humanitarian efforts.